Robert Millis
Related Ephemera
LP HMS 055


Chain DLK

July 2020

This LP from Robert Millis is a reflection on the fact that early shellac and wax cylinder records were fleeting novelty items, and decidedly temporary, at odds with the long-term collectivity and adoration that they inspire in some today. The source material is predominantly the surface noise and hiss from old records, but with a large helping of atmospheric and melodic ambient sounds to provide meat as well. Due to the deliberate artifacting, it was mastered twice, once for vinyl and once for digital, with apparently very different results, so I should say I’m commenting on the digital version here, where a lot of the crackling sounds feel almost electronic, like sci-fi locust noises, and not old but rather surprisingly new and clean.

The real composition, if you like, is actually the slow glass-like melodic elements that run underneath the noise, while old shellac recording material as found sound is sometimes more of a cameo than the central focus (final track "Lament (I Always Hesitate)" sums this up in barely one minute). On the first side of the LP is a single 20-minute piece "Samsara" which is extremely spacious, almost barren, but with slow changes in this fragile tone keeping a dynamic going, while the second side contains six shorter pieces with a bit more diversity. Pieces like "Matters Of Court", are generally a little more traditionally composed, bordering at times on abstract symphonic, with some beautiful string work, while "Further Evidence To The Contrary" is an interesting little piece from the softest edge of glitch work. The fragile tones return with the almost-choral atmosphere of "Only Here For A Short While", before being interrupted very abruptly by an old spoken-word recording, and for contrast, the almost inaudibly low drone of "Theories Of The Lower Twelve" wanders into sonic space that old vinyl could never get anywhere close to reproducing.

As love letters to old shellac and vinyl go, this one is rather obscure. But as an experimental ambient work that eats up the ambitious challenge of merging vinyl found sounds with some absolutely gorgeous melodic elements, it’s rich and impressive. - Stuart Bruce